Category: Recruiters

10 Tips for Dealing with Recruiters

Submitted by Lori GrantGuerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 2.o

Are you a job seeker looking for how to deal with recruiters? David Perry is Managing Partner of Perry-Martel International, Inc. an international Executive Search & Recruiting firm specializing in high technology. The Perry-Martel International, Inc. website offers articles for candidates, including “10 Tips for Dealing with Recruiters.” Perry’s ten tips are the following:

  1. Find a recruiter BEFORE you absolutely have to have a new job
  2. Find a recruiter that specializes in your talents
  3. Find a recruiter that you like to work with and that you trust
  4. Don’t be too quick to send your resume to an unknown but “smooth talking” recruiter… especially if you’re still employed
  5. Provide the recruiter with current salary information and expectations
  6. Don’t put important facts in the cover letter you send to a recruiter
  7. Make it easy for a recruiter to get and read your resume
  8. Recruiters are usually NOT good vehicles to help you change careers
  9. Executive recruiters recruit; career counselors counsel
  10. Executive recruiters recruit; bus drivers drive busses

Recruiters are interesting. I was once pitched the perfect VP of Marketing job for a C-level position in my industry. I remember the scope of the job being impressive. It was a new position that reported into the President; it was responsible for all marketing related functions like strategic and tactical planning, market segmentation, product marketing, product management and development, recruitment and management of the marketing team, marketing communications, lead generation, creation and support of joint-marketing partnerships, educating potential clients, and optimizing resources to assist the sales team.

While I was tempted because of the product management responsibilities, I was already in my dream job with a boss I loved reporting into and working with, a management team that I had fun working with, and team that I adored. Needless to say, I didn’t pursue the opportunity with the recruiter. However, what I did learn was the once you’re at the C-level, recruiters search for industry-specific company websites for potential recruits, and then poach executives listed on site. It was an interesting exercise to receive phone calls from recruiters quietly calling into our company switch board to talk with me. Perry’s ten tips should help you if you understand recruiters.

As for David Perry, he’s responsible for hiring 700+ Presidents, senior executives and key technical people in his position. Another reason why Perry’s name may sound familiar is because he’s the coauthor of Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters: 400 Unconventional Tips, Tricks, and Tactics for Landing Your Dream Job.

How to Save Your Cover Letter from the ‘DELETE’ Key!

By

Skip Freeman

Skip Freeman

Let’s face it, many, if not most cover letters are . . . well . . . to put it as diplomatically as possible . . . extremely B – O – O – O – R – I – N – G and largely without any apparent direction or focus. They are also essentially a waste of time, both for the job seeker who writes and send them, and certainly for the recruiter or hiring manager who receives them. That’s at least part of the reason most of them get the same treatment—they either end up in the “circular file” or, if sent through Email, quickly and summarily get the old “delete” key treatment.

Below is an example of the typical cover letter, sent either through the mail or via Email, that I—and most other recruiters and hiring managers—receive each and every single business day:

Dear Mr. Freeman

Attached is my resume for consideration for any sales positions that you may have. Please give me a phone call to review my credentials and how I may be of value to one of the clients you represent.

Sincerely,

Mr./Ms. Job Seeker

What, specifically, are the problems with such a cover letter? Let me cite just two of the more glaring deficiencies.

First, the job seeker asks for “any sales position that you may have.” Does he or she really mean any sales position? Of course not. If, for example, the job seeker has a background in, say, insurance sales (something that we can’t learn from the cover letter, but it is hoped we will learn from the “attached” résumé), would he or she really be interested (not to mention qualified for!) in a chemical sales position I might be trying to fill? Again, of course not.

Second, has this job seeker honestly given me (or any other recruiter/hiring manager) any compelling reason(s) to pick up the telephone and make the call to him or her? The answer, of course, is a resounding NO! Has he or she included any kind of “value proposition” in the cover letter to arouse my interest and get my attention? Again, the answer is a resounding NO!

So, how, exactly, is an effective cover letter designed, one that stands a very good chance of getting read? Below is an example of a cover letter that certainly could be expected to catch my attention, as well as the attention of most other recruiters and hiring managers.

Dear Mr. Freeman: (NOTE THAT THE CORRECT PUNCTUATION TO USE IN THIS SALUTATION IS THE COLON, NOT A COMMA AND CERTAINLY NOT A SEMI-COLON)

Are your client companies happy with their time to market and sales to date, or are you of the opinion that there’s room for improvement between now and the end of this year? Do they have all the new business revenue they want and deserve? Do they have all the fresh ideas that will help them surpass their strategic goals and objectives? (WHAT A GREAT LIST OF PERTINENT, ATTENTION-GETTING QUESTIONS!)

With this year just flying by, do you think there is enough time left for any changes and the improvement that change can bring? If you could present a sales professional to your client companies who is sitting on a $20 million pipeline, is that something you would be interested in? ($20 MILLION PIPELINE?! WOW! YES, THAT IS SOMETHING A RECRUITER OR HIRING MANAGER WOULD BE INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE ABOUT, HUH?!)

If any of these initiatives are of interest to your client companies, why don’t you make your last business call of this day to me. I’ll be prepared to answer any questions you may have about my ideas and solutions and how we might be able to put them both to work for your client companies. (NOW THIS IS SOMETHING UNUSUAL IN A JOB SEEKER’S COVER LETTER—HE ACTUALLY ASKED FOR THE ORDER!)

I’ll be in my office today between 3:00 and 6:00 P.M. Eastern Time if you would like to contact me. My number is 678-123-4567. Otherwise, I will reach out to you Friday, October 1, at 10 AM ET. (I HAVE TWO CHOICES HERE: I CAN CALL THIS JOB SEEKER AS SOON AS POSSIBLE AT THE TIMES HE IS AVAILABLE, OR I CAN SIMPLY WAIT AND EXPECT HIS CALL! ONE WAY OR THE OTHER, THOUGH, THIS JOB SEEKER IS DETERMINED TO VISIT WITH ME! P.S. IT’S VERY LIKELY THAT, IF HIS RÉSUMÉ IS AS SOLID AND AS WELL-THOUGHT-OUT AS HIS COVER LETTER, IT WILL BE I WHO CALLS HIM FIRST!)

Thank you for the consideration.

To greater success,

Mr./Ms. Job Seeker

To be sure, it takes a little more time and effort to create a cover letter like the second one presented here. But, when you consider that sending a generic, anemic, boring cover letter like the first example shown can only be expected to result in its being “trashed” by a recruiter or hiring manager . . . well . . . spending the extra time and effort literally becomes a “no-brainer,” doesn’t it?

______________________________________________________________

Skip Freeman, author of “Headhunter” Hiring Secrets: The Rules of the Hiring Game Have Changed . . . Forever!, has successfully completed more than 300 executive search assignments in just seven years. Specializing in the placement of sales, engineering, manufacturing and R&D professionals in industry, he has developed powerful techniques that help companies hire the best and help the best get hired.

A distinguished graduate of the United States Military Academy, West Point, he is a lifelong student of leadership, people and the principles of success. While serving in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Chemical Corps, he also earned a Master of Science degree in Organic Chemistry from The Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Business Administration degree in Marketing from Long Island University.

 Visit or contact Skip at his book website, http://www.headhunterhiringsecrets.com

# 4 – Top 10 Reasons Occupy Wall Street Protestors Can’t Find a Job

# 4 You Don't Know What to Do When a Recruiter Calls

Here’s what to do if a recruiter calls you at work.

Be flattered.  If a recruiter calls you in most cases the recruiter’s team has prequalified you.  Don’t ask them where they got your name right away.  There’s time enough for that later.  Fotolia_858849_XS(1)

Take the call only if you can speak without whispering.  If you can’t talk freely, ask for their phone number and a convenient time to call back.  Better you say nothing than blow the call.  This also gives you an opportunity to look up the recruiter’s firm to make sure the call is legit.  Take a minute to first read their web site to see if they normally recruit people like you.  Can’t find their site?  That’s an early warning sign.  Check if they using a Yahoo, Hotmail, Gmail or other generic account.  Yes?  Be careful.  It may be a ruse from your employer trying to cull the ranks for deserters, ahead of an upcoming layoff.  If they send an unsolicited email to your work address respond that you’re not interested because employers can legally monitor your email.  Then send a follow up email from your hotmail account.

Ask the recruiter the following questions.  Do not deviate from this exact sequence.  Get it out of order and you won’t get the right answers – recruiters are some of the savviest business people on the planet.

Are you on retainer or contingency?

WHAT YOU SHOULD UNDERSTAND – You want to know how the recruiter is being compensated — retainer or contingency.  Learning this can tell you if the project is real or if they’re fishing.  It may also tell you how quickly you have to decide whether you are interested in being considered.  If the recruiter is on retainer the project is real.  Go forward.  You have time to consider your options.

If the firm is on contingency the recruiter is likely under the gun to close the project before another firm does.  Time is of the essence.  You must move quickly if you are interested.  First, I suggest you ask the following:

Do you have an exclusive?

WHAT YOU SHOULD UNDERSTAND – If they have an exclusive it means that they are the only firm working on the assignment.  Listen to the recruiter describe the opportunity and decide if you want to go forward.  If they don’t have an exclusive they are competing with other firms and possibly even the employer’s own internal human resource people.

Have you successfully placed people with this hiring manager before?

WHAT YOU SHOULD UNDERSTAND – It pays to be cautious.  You need to decide if the recruiter has the capacity to represent you and get you an interview.  From the moment they forward your resume to the employer, the recruiter is entitled to be paid their full fee [for a period as long as a year or more] should that employer hire you, regardless.  Understand, even if you were to land an interview on your own during that period – the employer would need to pay the recruiter’s fee, even if it was for a different job in a different department or division.  “Hold on”, you say, I don’t even know who the employer is!”  Too bad.  That’s the Catch-22.  It’s your responsibility to get as much information as you can and make an informed decision to forward your resume to the recruiter. 

Have you vetted the job description with the client, and may I have a copy?

WHAT YOU SHOULD UNDERSTAND – If they haven’t met with the client or vetted the job description with the client, it’s not ideal for you, but it’s not necessarily the end either.  Fotolia_35157331_XSAsk for a written copy of the job description.  Read it carefully and ask the recruiter as many questions as they’ll allow. And make an informed decision to proceed.  Should the recruiter refuse [rare] I advise my closest friends to terminate the call – yes I have a few friends…  The recruiter is just looking to fill his database of candidates.  He/she may be performing business development and wants some new resumes to introduce himself to prospective companies. 

Recruiting Industry revenues are in the $100's of Billions globally – with almost 50% in North America.  Recruiters can accelerate your career and help you find a grat job faster than the average 39 weeks in now takes in America – but only if yoiu understand how to work with them and what some of the potholes are. 

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Top 10 Reasons the Occupy Wall Street Protestors Can’t Find a Job

# 10 – You’re Gulliable

# 9 – You’re Invissible

# 8 – You’re Irrelevant

# 7 – You Network Like a Girl!

# 6 – Your Resume is Ugly

# 5 – Your Cover Letter is Boring…