7 steps to Success: How to Plan the Perfect Job Search

Rogue Recruiter : September 12, 2013 10:00 pm : Featured, Interviewing

Would you ever walk into a busy airport, amble up to the counter and say, “I want to go on vacation. Could I have a ticket, please?” Of course not. You’d get nothing but a baffled look from the ticket agent (not to mention a body search from Homeland Security).

Finding your ideal job is like taking a dream vacation. You can get there from here and have the time of your life. But first you need to know where you’re going, then plan how to get there.

STEP 1
To find the shortest route to your next job, you need to create a plan that is detailed in every way. The ideal plan will be solution oriented, results driven, marketing based, inexpensive to execute, realistic and specific.

Here are some ideas for incorporating those elements into your job-search plan.

Solution Oriented

News flash: Rarely is it the most qualified candidate who gets hired. (If you’ve ever had a nincompoop for a manager, you know exactly what I mean.)

In the real world, jobs often go to those who best position themselves as the solution to a problem. Now here’s the catch: Employers often don’t realize they have a problem until someone points it out to them. So, if you can identify employers’ problems – and offer yourself as the best solution – you’ll increase your chances of getting hired. Immediately. Every time.

Results Driven

Like a runner training for a marathon, you must measure your progress. Doing so tells you how close you are to your goal. It also keeps you motivated and committed to your plan.

Measuring results requires you to track certain details. Here are a few of the dozens of proven tactics from my book, Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters, that you can track:

Marketing Based

In business, the companies with the best marketing usually win. Winning the War for Talent is similar. It requires you to become proficient at marketing yourself better than other candidates.

Looking for a job is a sales and marketing activity – and you are the product.

Inexpensive

In 1997, Tom Peters introduced the concept of “The Brand Called You.” At the time, personal branding was a sort of luxury, reserved for high-flying techies and senior executives who wanted to maximize the financial returns of their biggest asset – their career.

Today personal branding is no luxury – it’s a requirement for career survival. For more on how to brand yourself for free, visit GuerrillaJobHunting.com, and click on the appropriate topic.

Realistic

Knowing what you want to do is good. Combining it with what you are ‘qualified’ to do is even better. You may be pleasantly surprised at how your current skill set can transfer to other industries.

For a clear picture of what’s possible with your skills, visit America’s Career InfoNet (acinet.org). If you’re not qualified for what you want to do, get moving and determine how to get qualified.

In my 20+ years of executive recruiting, the biggest problem I’ve run into is that people aren’t realistic – especially unemployed people. You’re setting yourself up for disappointment if you apply for jobs you’re not qualified to do. Sometimes you may have to take a temporary step backward to move forward in a new career. BUT . . . the sooner you take that step, the sooner you’ll arrive at your goal.

Specific

Knowing the exact title and function of the job you seek gives you a clear, specific goal, with no possibility for error. If you have a clear target and don’t hit it, you’ll know for sure. So, get clear and get specific. The more, the better.

For example, I’ll wager that Vicki Vlachakis knew exactly what she wanted to do and who she wanted to work for before she started her job search. When the opportunity came along to design the new two-seater convertibles for Saturn and Chrysler, she recognized her chance to hit not one, but two home runs in her career.

Nothing is more important to your success than a clear ‘picture’ of your goal. (Please read that sentence again. I’ll wait 🙂

If you can envision your dream job AND you’re qualified to do it, then you can find it. With a specific goal in mind, you can organize your job search and networking efforts with a laser-like focus.

Yes, some people are lucky and fall into great jobs, but luck (as Tom Peters says) is terribly unpredictable. The dramatic changes in today’s world of work mean that tried-and-true methods of job hunting will soon be outmoded.

The one constant in all successful job searches, however, is clarity of purpose. It will give you the goal you seek and the fuel to reach it. So, get specific, get clear, get busy . . . and get hired!


David E. Perry is the author of Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters and the Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters Blog. Kevin Donlin, creator of GetHiredNow.TV also contributed to this article.

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Heads Up! The Telephone Interview is Usually a ‘Trap’!

SkipFreeman : October 10, 2010 12:34 pm : Interviewing

By

Skip Freeman

Skip Freeman

Great news! All your prospecting and presenting activities have paid off and you’ve landed a telephone interview with a prospective employer. This is an opportunity, correct? Well, yes and no. Actually, you’ve simply made it to “step one” in the hiring process. The more important “step two” is landing the all important face-to-face interview, which really is the principal goal of the telephone interview, i.e., getting before a hiring manager.

While it’s certainly understandable that you will be excited about getting the telephone interview, heads up! Oftentimes, though certainly not always, the telephone interview is actually a trap. Let me explain.

Despite what many of today’s job seekers think and believe, the hiring process is not one of inclusion. Rather, it is one of exclusion. That is, hiring managers and companies are not looking for candidates to include in the hiring pool; they are looking for ways to eliminate as many candidates as possible from that pool, up front, so that they can sooner get to the candidate(s) they ultimately will hire.

This is especially true if you are applying for a position with a large company. Normally, with these companies, the initial telephone interview will be conducted by a professional “screener,” not the actual hiring manager. Sometimes a third party may be hired by the company to screen candidates, or the screener may simply be someone from the company’s Human Resources Department. Virtually all of these screeners are trained to sound upbeat, enthusiastic and friendly, all attitudes designed to immediately put candidates at ease. That way, candidates will be more likely to accidentally “spill the beans” with various faux pas, thereby making it easier—and quicker!—for the screener to eliminate them.

After participating in one of these telephone interviews, rare indeed is the candidate who is not absolutely convinced that he or she nailed the interview. They think that the job is practically theirs! Nothing could be further from the truth. Remember, no one is ever hired as the result of a telephone interview.

So, how should you prepare for a telephone interview to keep from falling into this trap? Below are some recommendations for properly preparing for and conducting a telephone interview:

Research the company and the position. Learn the company’s “hot buttons” and then sell them on what you know they need, i.e., tell the how you can either “make ‘em money” or “save ‘em money,” or ideally, how to do both of these things.

Review news release and other public information about the company, as well as quarterly and annual reports. Pay particular attention to such communications as the CEO letter to stockholders. Learn about any new product releases, facilities expansions, etc.

Learn in advance who will be conducting the telephone interview, if you can. Check for that person’s LinkedIn profile and/or ZoomInfo profile. “Google” the person to learn as much about them as you can.

Do NOT, under any circumstances, bring up compensation, benefits or vacation! If you are asked your current salary or the salary you expect from the position being applied for, state something along these lines: “Susan, the most important goal is the opportunity. If I am the right person for this job from your perspective, and indeed, if the company is the right company for me, then I am confident that the salary will be more than fair.” And leave it at that!

Write down any questions you plan to ask during the telephone interview.

Use positive phrasing during the interview, such as “I know” rather than “I think.”

Never, never, never speak negatively of anyone or anything—a former boss, co-worker or company.

Always emphasize why you want to go to work for the company, NOT why you desire to leave your present company.

Do not try to evade any question. If you don’t know the answer to any particular question, simply say so, and then say you’ll get the answer and call back.

If things sound good to you, then say so! Don’t try to play “poker.” Remember, the interviewer can’t see you, so verbalize your reactions/feelings.

If something doesn’t sound good to you, do NOT confront (and therefore alienate) the interviewer.

“Close” at the end of the interview, using a statement such as this: “Jim, I really appreciate your time today, and I am genuinely excited about and interested in this opportunity. Based upon our conversation, is there anything else that will keep us from moving on to the next step?”

Avoid mention of anything personal, such as marital status, sexual orientation, state of your (or your family’s) health, etc.

If you will keep these telephone interview “do’s” and “don’t’s” in mind, you will be in far better position to indeed “nail” the telephone interview than 90 percent of your “competition,” i.e., other job seekers. Most of them will continue to “wing it” during the telephone interview and increase the chances of making major faux pas, and as a result, the majority of them will be excluded from further consideration, quickly and finally. Believe that.

_______________________________________________

Skip Freeman, “headhunter” and author of “Headhunter” Hiring Secrets: The Rules of the Hiring Game Have Changed . . . Forever!, has successfully completed more than 300 executive search assignments in just seven years. Specializing in the placement of sales, engineering, manufacturing and R&D professionals in industry, he has developed powerful techniques that help companies hire the best and help the best get hired.

A distinguished graduate of the United States Military Academy, West Point, he is a lifelong student of leadership, people and the principles of success. While serving in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Chemical Corps, he also earned a Master of Science degree in Organic Chemistry from The Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Business Administration degree in Marketing from Long Island University.

Visit or contact Skip at his book website, http://www.headhunterhiringsecrets.com

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Are YOU Casting ‘Shadows on the Wall’ During Job Interviews?

SkipFreeman : September 30, 2010 1:50 pm : Interviewing

By

Skip Freeman

 

Skip Freeman

Remember when you were a small child and your mother put you in bed, kissed you good night and slipped quietly out of your bedroom? Remember how snug, safe and secure you felt as you were slowly drifting off to sleep? But then . . . on some nights, the wind may have suddenly picked up, the trees outside your bedroom window began swaying to and fro, casting frightening shadows on your bedroom wall! You felt uneasy . . . scared . . . unsure about how to react. It’s likely you merely threw the covers over your head, snuggled deeper into your bed, closed your eyes and tried to block out the whole frightening image. (OK, admit it, some of you yelled for your mother to come back to your bedroom!)

You might be surprised to learn that, particularly in today’s brutal job market, many hiring managers (and other “screeners”), afraid to make a mistake that could cost them their jobs if they hire the “wrong” people, demonstrate similar fears whenever a candidate casts “shadows on the wall” during a telephone or face-to-face interview. (Although admittedly, they don’t usually yell for their mothers!) Let me give you a couple of examples on what I’m talking about here.

KEEP YOUR ‘SECRET’ CAREER DESIRES TO YOURSELF!

A friend of mine is a Human Resources screener, a position he has held for nearly thirty years. He has an uncanny knack for immediately putting a candidate at ease during an interview.

A couple of years ago, I sent my friend a candidate for a technical sales position his company had open, and my friend said he would like to conduct a telephone interview with the candidate.

It just so happened that my friend had been in the candidate’s hometown once for a baseball game, so he and the candidate chatted briefly about their mutual love of the game. Then, the Human Resources screener asked a typical, “warm and fuzzy” question:

“If you could wave a magic wand and be anything you wanted to be, what would that be?” he asked the candidate.

By this time, the candidate was feeling very comfortable with his “new buddy,” so he responded, quite honestly, with this response (remember the candidate was interviewing for a technical sales position):

“If I could wave that magic wand and be anything I wanted to be, I would want to be in product marketing,” the young candidate said.

“Why would you want to do that?” the HR screener asked the candidate.

The candidate then went on for at least another five minutes about his deep interest in marketing. How he wanted to get an MBA in marketing. How he felt he would like to be able to position products strongly through well-done sales literature, creative training materials, etc.

Typically, a phone interview with this company would last about an hour. This one lasted just 20 minutes.

Soon after the telephone interview, the candidate called me and said, “Skip, the interview went GREAT! I think I nailed it and I am so excited.”

Upon learning from the candidate that the phone interview had lasted only 20 minutes, instead of the typical hour, I knew, instinctively, that the only thing the candidate could possibly have “nailed” was his own foot to the floor! The evidence that I was correct came very shortly thereafter when the screener called me.

“Skip, your candidate doesn’t even want to be in technical sales,” he said. “He wants to be a product marketer, so that’s the type of job he really needs to find.”

In other words, this candidate cast a “shadow” on the screener’s “wall”!

If you are interviewing for a sales position, you want to be in sales more than anything else in your life. If you are interviewing for an accountant’s position, you want to be an accountant more than anything else in your life. During an interview, you want to be in that particular role more than anything else in your life. (And this is true, at least during the interview, right??!!)

KEEP PERSONAL BUSINESS STRICTLY PERSONAL

I presented another candidate for a marketing position in Denver. The candidate lived in Dallas. She was a high-quality, very-qualified candidate, too, just like the candidate previously mentioned. Still, she also managed to cast a “shadow on the wall” and exclude herself during her phone interview. About 45 minutes into the interview, which had gone rather well up to that point, the screener simply asked,

“Why would you want to leave Dallas and move to Denver?”

This was the answer the candidate gave to the question:

“My husband is running around on me, so I am going to divorce him. I don’t care where I go, just as long as it gets me out of Dallas.”

Talk about “shadows on the wall”! And that “shadow” got even bigger in the hiring manager’s mind.

“Skip,” the hiring manager told me over the phone, “If she can’t keep her personal information confidential, then how do we know she would keep company information confidential? We just can’t take that risk.”

Think these are just isolated incidents? Think again! These type of faux pas during telephone and face-to-face interviews happen all the time, and are committed by otherwise highly qualified, very intelligent job candidates. Almost without exception these unfortunate “missteps” are sufficient for most hiring managers or other “screeners” to summarily exclude candidates from further consideration.

Remember that old saying about “putting your brain in gear before engaging your mouth”? That’s really good advice when it comes to either the telephone or the face-to-face job interview. Don’t be lulled in to a false sense of security because you think you have found “your new best friend” in the interviewer. Keeping this in mind will keep you from casting “shadows on the wall,” something that will take your right out of the running for a job—regardless of how well qualified you may be.

_______________________________________

Skip Freeman, author of “Headhunter” Hiring Secrets: The Rules of the Hiring Game Have Changed . . . Forever!, has successfully completed more than 300 executive search assignments in just seven years. Specializing in the placement of sales, engineering, manufacturing and R&D professionals in industry, he has developed powerful techniques that help companies hire the best and help the best get hired.

A distinguished graduate of the United States Military Academy, West Point, he is a lifelong student of leadership, people and the principles of success. While serving in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Chemical Corps, he also earned a Master of Science degree in Organic Chemistry from The Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Business Administration degree in Marketing from Long Island University.

 Visit or contact Skip at his book website, http://www.headhunterhiringsecrets.com

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Never Rebut an Objection—’Roll’ With It!

SkipFreeman : September 30, 2010 5:52 pm : Featured, Interviewing

By

Skip Freeman

Editor’s Note: This blog is an excerpt from Skip’s book, “Headhunter” Hiring Secrets: The Rules of the Hiring Game Have Changed . . . Forever!

Skip Freeman

There is always a natural tendency to attempt to rebut each and every objection you might receive when conducting your telephone prospecting (or while interviewing). The secret to handling objections, though, is simply to “roll with them”! Get a dialogue going! Rebutting an objection causes tension and anxiety, and seldom gets you anywhere.

In wrestling, martial arts and hand-to-hand combat, the easiest way to deflect the opponent is to “roll with them,” not block them. Someone is coming at you, use their momentum to keep them going past you.

Let’s review some common objections and how to roll with them.

For example, get prepared for this Number One objection:

“You need to call HR.”

The best way to handle this objection, which will occur often enough to become an issue, is by using a response like this:

“Sure, I can call HR. But before I do, may I ask if I am the type of individual you could see making a contribution to your team?” (You didn’t try to block the objection. You “rolled with it” by saying, “Sure I can call HR.” You have agreed with them, which they weren’t expecting. Now, when you ask the follow-up question, they are more apt to work with you.)

Another, very common objection you will encounter when telephone prospecting:

“We are not hiring.”

Here is how you might handle this response:

“I didn’t necessarily think you were at this point. If someone were to resign, or when business increases at some point in the near future, am I the type of individual you would be interested in speaking with?” (Assuming you have laid out your credentials. Otherwise you can say/ask, “I didn’t necessarily call thinking you were hiring right now. What is the best way for me to get my information in front of you, so that if someone were to resign, or when business increases at some point in time, I will be ‘top of mind’ in terms of being able to bring value to you in a position?”)

Let me give you an example of an objection I, as a recruiter, hear virtually every day:

“We don’t use recruiters.”

My response is always something like this:

“I understand. Please tell me, when you have a very difficult position to fill, how do you go about filling it?”

Notice, I don’t “push back”—I merely “roll with it,” and you should too. What do I mean by pushing back? If I responded something like this, “The reason you should use recruiters is. . . .” I would be pushing back.

Let me share with you one more instructive example:

Someone tells you:

“You need to go to our website, see what positions are open and apply online.”

(You)

“Certainly, I can do that. By the way, may I ask you a question? (Remember, selling is not telling, it is asking.)

(Their response)

“Sure.”

(You)

“What do you feel makes your company a unique place to work?”

Assume they respond with something positive. Then, you could say,

“Wow, that sounds interesting and it sounds like you enjoy working there?”

(Their response)

“Yes, I do.”

(You)

“May I send my information to you? I would like to be able to stay in touch with someone who is as excited about his work and company as you are. That is somewhat rare these days.”

Now, she may or may not agree to do that, but it is a way to again develop an insider who might ultimately sponsor you. You didn’t debate why you shouldn’t apply online, you didn’t whine (spew venom) about how you have applied online six times and have never heard from someone.

Though there are no “magic words” for overcoming objections, there is a “magic formula,” and this is it:

• Don’t push back. Do not become (or appear) argumentative.
• Ask questions. Get a dialogue going.
• As you will learn further on in the face-to-face section, “lead the witness.” Implement that here.

_________________________________________

Skip Freeman, author of “Headhunter” Hiring Secrets: The Rules of the Hiring Game Have Changed . . . Forever!, has successfully completed more than 300 executive search assignments in just seven years. Specializing in the placement of sales, engineering, manufacturing and R&D professionals in industry, he has developed powerful techniques that help companies hire the best and help the best get hired.

A distinguished graduate of the United States Military Academy, West Point, he is a lifelong student of leadership, people and the principles of success. While serving in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Chemical Corps, he also earned a Master of Science degree in Organic Chemistry from The Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Business Administration degree in Marketing from Long Island University.

Visit or contact Skip at his book website, http://www.headhunterhiringsecrets.com

1 Comment »

Learn to ‘Lead the Witness’ During Job Interviews

SkipFreeman : October 4, 2010 3:37 pm : Featured, Interviewing, Strategy, Tactics

By

Skip Freeman

Skip Freeman

While it’s a big “no-no” for attorneys to “lead the witness” during a trial, i.e., try to “put words in a witness’s mouth” to shape testimony, learning how to effectively use this little-known, though very valuable skill can pay BIG dividends for a job seeker during a job interview.

You might suppose that most hiring managers would be really good at conducting job interviews. You would be wrong, though. Because the typical manager hires relatively few new people over an entire career, he or she usually doesn’t have the skills necessary to be great interviewers. Most, though certainly not all, really don’t even know where to begin an interview, what to ask of the person being interviewed, or even the direction in which to take the interview. So, as a job candidate, you’ve got to learn how to “lead the witness” and direct them where you know they want to go—even if they don’t know themselves!

Let me caution you here, however, “leading the witness” is NOT the same thing as taking over (or hogging) the interview!

What is it that a hiring manager instinctively wants to learn from you during an interview, again, even if they themselves are not consciously aware of it? Virtually all hiring managers want you, the job candidate, to answer essentially FOUR questions for them:

• Can you do the job?
• Do you want to do the job?
Will you do the job?
• Are you a good cultural fit?

So, knowing this, carefully craft your answers to questions not only to address the specific question(s) being asked, but also to directly or indirectly address any (or all) of these four implied questions. In other words, feel free to “lead the witness,” i.e., the hiring manager.

Let’s suppose, for example, that you are applying for a technical sales position and the hiring manager asks you (in an attempt to determine if you can actually do the job),

“I notice from your résumé that you had increased sales of over $2 million during the last three years. Tell me how you were able to accomplish that.”

A good answer, and equally importantly, one that incorporates the principle of “leading the witness,” might be this:

“I firmly believe in the necessity to continually prospect. For example, I have identified all of the potential buyers of my company’s products within my geographical territory and I call on them on a regular basis. With some prospects you have to make many calls over time to win their business, while with others, you just happen to call on them at the right time to win their business. The key is that you are calling, so that when they have a ‘pain point,’ you are there.”

“Consistently taking this approach has allowed me to steadily increase sales.”

Even though the hiring manager’s question was relatively straightforward and ostensibly designed as somewhat of a “warm up” question, your answer not only addresses the implicit question of can you do the job, it also amply demonstrates that you want to do the job and that you will do the job as well.

A perennial favorite question asked by hiring managers is this one:

“If you are the successful candidate for this position, where do you see yourself in, say, five years?”

This apparently “innocent” question is anything but, so be particularly alert when answering it. Again, even though the hiring manager may not consciously be aware of it, the question actually is designed to determine if you want to do the specific job for which you are being interviewed.

If you’re at all like most candidates, you likely will perceive this question to be designed to determine how “ambitious” you are, how motivated you are to “grow” beyond the position and within the company. Nine times out of ten, that’s really not the case at all. For example, let’s assume you are interviewing for a position as a chemist and you answer the question this way:

“I really think, with my qualifications, education and skill set, that I could easily be supervising the entire department in five years.”

It’s highly unlikely that you will endear yourself (or be the successful candidate!) to the hiring manager, who probably will feel you’ve way over-stepped your boundaries, not to mention be perceived as arrogant and presumptuous. He or she may even feel personally threatened by thinking that the job you really want is his or hers!

A much better answer, and again, one that allows you to “lead the witness,” would be one like this:

“Over the next five years, I want to become known as the person who can develop new, novel surfactant technology that makes the company money. I see myself hitting the ground learning the processes and procedures that you follow, understanding the mission of the group and how it aligns with the company goals, then immersing myself in new product development, where I can apply my creativity and help the company make products that customers want so we all make money. I would love to be able to help write some technical papers, help patent some products and do anything possible to make this lab team world-renowned in what we do.”

Wouldn’t an answer like this allay most fears or concerns in the hiring manager’s mind that you want to do this specific job?

Assuming that you have satisfactorily answered (and implemented the tactic of “leading the witness,” where appropriate) the questions of Can you do the job? Do you want to do the job? Will you do the job? you can then expect to be asked questions to determine the final criterion for acceptance in the hiring manager’s mind: Are you a good cultural fit (for the hiring unit, the company and the hiring manager himself/herself).

That question usually is phrased along these lines:

“What do you do if you have a conflict with a co-worker?”

While there are a number of ways to correctly answer such questions, here is one good way:

“Unfortunately, in life there is conflict, and that includes in the workplace. What you must not do is become offended. Everyone has a right to his or her own opinion. You respect the opinions of your co-workers, ask questions and work to iron out any differences.

“If it is affecting the project or the goals of the company and we can’t work it out, then I will take it to a trusted colleague to see if she can offer some helpful advice. If that fails, then it may be time to have a confidential conversation with my boss. I only will do that if indeed it is having a negative impact on the company’s performance.”

How can you become adept at providing such well-thought-out answers and, at the same time, directly or indirectly answer the important FOUR questions in the back of every hiring manager’s mind? Anticipate the questions you’re likely to be asked during an interview, then create—and memorize!—stories and “word pictures” so that the hiring manager not only “hears” what you’re saying, but also “see” what you’re saying. Then, finally, practice, practice, practice! Believe me, that’s what successful candidates do and I guarantee it will be well worth the effort!

________________________________________

Skip Freeman, author of “Headhunter” Hiring Secrets: The Rules of the Hiring Game Have Changed . . . Forever!, has successfully completed more than 300 executive search assignments in just seven years. Specializing in the placement of sales, engineering, manufacturing and R&D professionals in industry, he has developed powerful techniques that help companies hire the best and help the best get hired.

A distinguished graduate of the United States Military Academy, West Point, he is a lifelong student of leadership, people and the principles of success. While serving in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Chemical Corps, he also earned a Master of Science degree in Organic Chemistry from The Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Business Administration degree in Marketing from Long Island University.

 Visit or contact Skip at his book website, http://www.headhunterhiringsecrets.com

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Commando Job Search Tactic #1: Be Hunted

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : January 31, 2011 7:23 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes, Strategy

  Man with bullhorn Be Hunted.  Like Google, if you don’t rank among the first 3 people a recruiter thinks of when they’re starting a project… you won’t get “clicked” for the opportunity. 

Increase your visibility and expand your network by presenting at conferences, seminars – even usergroups.  Ask to be your company’s designated speaker.  You   can have someone else write the material if need be.  Public speaking is an effective job hunting technique.  Recruiters will beat a path to your door.

It's a million times easier for yoiu to answer the phone than to try and get an employer to talk to yoiu if you're looking for one  – right!

For more great Guerrilla ideas, grab your copy of our Free Audio.

David Perry and Kevin Donlin
Co-Creators, "The Guerrilla Job Search System"

 

 

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Day 3 – The 12 Days of Christmas Job Hunting

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : December 9, 2010 7:36 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes, Strategy

Day 3

On the 3rd of Christmas — Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters revealed to me:

 

The 3 R’s of job-hunting

In grade school we learned the 3 Rs of Reading, wRriting and aRithmetic.  Those were our most important lessons [ok so I’m dating myself].  For job-hunters it’s Research, Relevancy, and Resiliency which will deliver an A+ interview.

Research

As a job-hunter you need to research and determine:

♦   what are your marketable skills;

♦   which industries/companies you should target that use those skills;

♦   what are the specific needs of each company in your target market;

♦   who’s in a key position to hire you in those companies [who can say YES to hiring you AND it won’t be human resources unless you’re an HR professional]; and

♦   what’s the best way to approach them?

The way you approach people will be determined by your research.  There’s more about research in the book.

Relevancy

Your skills have to fit an employer’s needs.  It has to solve the employer’s hot buttons [their corporate weaknesses – this could be sales, market development, research ops].  Remember it’s not about you it’s about THEM!    At the core employers’ initially only want to know three things about you:

♦   Can you make me money?

♦   Can you save me money? and/or

♦   Can you increase our efficiencies?

 

As global competitiveness increases, employers will be looking for all three of the above.  In Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters the book we clearly demonstrate how to express your relevancy – “Value” – to an employer.

Resiliency

Resiliency is the ability to spring back from disappointment and keep moving forward.  This is a quality which keeps Guerrilla job hunters focused on their goals and driving forward on a daily basis. 

Adopt a positive mind set no matter what.  Here’s how you do it: You should have your job hunting goals sitting in front of you everyday and review it everyday.  Morning and night and then execute that plan.

Guerrilla job hunters always look for the positives even when people and events are clearly indicating they shouldn’t.  Guerrilla job hunters need to look under rocks too.    Let me end this section with a story that touches on all the points you’ve been reading about attitude.  This has been a taste of what’s in chapter # 2 of Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters.

 

The complete "12 Days of Christmas Job Hunting eBook" is here: http://tinyurl.com/2aqe6e3

 

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Sex sells.

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : April 4, 2011 6:56 am : Interviewing, Resumes

Does your resume excite and motivated people like lingerie from Victoria’s Secrets or Old flannel nightgown keep them guessing like flannel?

Make it easy for an employer to see what they’re after. And what exactly is sexy to an employer?  Quantifiable results and accomplishments!

Prepare a 1 page resume and dress it up with the names and logos of the major clients you’ve sold. Employers want to know about your wins first not your responsibilities.

Boring black and white resumes are like flannel nighties – they're comfortable but may not get you the attention you're looking for.  

 

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Guest blog: Selling Vacuums and Job Interviews

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : April 12, 2011 7:37 pm : Interviewing, Research

I have seen it a million times. People that are the perfect match for a job fold under the pressure of a job interview. The job market has changed, and no longer can you tell an employer about the tasks you did at your previous companies.JimFromTaxi

With so many skilled, educated and creative candidates to pick from, hiring managers are looking for the best of the best. They want to know if you fit into the company culture, what your Emotional Quotient is, who you are, and what you can do for them.

The only way to win the interview is to handle like a sales meeting where you present  yourself in the best possible light about what you can do for them. Let’s be honest. You are selling your services to them in exchange for pay and benefits.

If you want the job, you better be able to make a living selling vacuums.

I recently had the privilege to read a preview of David Perry’s new book, Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0: How to Stand Out from the Crowd and Tap Into the Hidden Job Market using Social Media and 999 other Tactics Today. What a book. There is so much information in it that was not in the previous 2 editions.

In one of the chapters he tells us that the 3-R’s have changed since we all went to school. No longer are they Reading, ‘Riting and “Rithmatic. He stresses that if you want to get an A+ and land your job you better focus Research, Relevancy, and Resiliency.

Without stealing his thunder, he is spot on. Unless you research a company from top to bottom you will never understand them. In doing your Research you must find a way to ensure that you are the Relevant solution to the needs the company has. You must also be Resilient. You have to learn how to handle all the no’s in life.

Those three R’s are the very tools that a good vacuum salesperson needs when going door to door.  The ones who have mastered those skills get paid well. Those who have not… well, you know.

Do you remember the show Taxi? It was one of my favorites. In one particular episode called “One The Job – Part 1”  the gang meets at Mario’s to discuss what they have been doing since the Sunshine Taxi Company went bankrupt.

Reverend Jim Ignatowski took up a new job selling vacuums door to door.  I want you to watch his use of David Perry’s 3-R’s here – http://bit.ly/fjOgLW

Will you fold under the pressure?

Or can you sell vacuums and master the job interview?

_____________________________________________________________________

Wayne Eells is the Founder and CEO of Eells Consulting which specializes in helping Entrepreneurs and Small Businesses achieve strong long term growth. Wayne’s 5-Star Backcast Method has earned him the label of Business Accelerator.  His experiences include working as a pastry chef, a firefighter/EMS provider, and working with NASCAR and the race teams.

 

 

 

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Preview of Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : April 18, 2011 7:21 am : General, Interviewing, Strategy, Tactics

G3 cover II Every year, 50-million jobs are filled in the United States — almost all without a job   posting.  Employers are relying on a brand new digital suite of tools and tactics to find the handful of “most qualified” recruits that they want to interview.”

Because of this, we put a booster rocket on our earlier book, going beyond ‘where to look’, to include "how to be found".  The secret to finding a suitable job today lies in mastering the digital search environment used by employers which includes, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter Branchout, HubSpot, ZoomInfo and more.  It's confusing mess so we've simplified it for you and focused on those tools that bring you results fast.

If you're interested, you may fill in your name and email address below to preview chapters of the book.  

Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0: How to Stand Out from the Crowd and Tap Into the Hidden Job Market using Social Media and 999 other Tactics Today  

 

 

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The 7 Rules of Engagment with Head-hunters: Rule 2

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 11, 2011 6:09 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes

The 7 Rules of Engagment is a multi-part article so you may wish to start here.

2nd Rule of Engagement: Find a head-hunter BEFORE you need a new job.    

Most job hunters are a lot like people who drive their cars until they run out of gas: pathetic souls standing on shoulder of life's highway waitng for someone to stop and help them out.  Not smart.  Guillotine

Don’t wait until you know you’re going to be reallocated to make friends with a headhunter because we all know 99% of people wait until their heads are in the guillotine and the blades being dropped before they wisper sweet nothings in our ears. 

Too late!  In business you always try to stay ahead of the curve.  Plan ahead! 

Put another way, you bought life insurance to prepare for the inevitable – treat your career as your biggest asset – goodness knows it’s not your house anymore. 

You need to have a six-month runway to work a head-hunter strategically.  Your initial contact is to let the head-hunter know you exist.  Your goal is to get them to keep you in mind for career-building positions opportunities and/or to market you.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

 

 

 

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Job hunter, want to be paid like basketball MVP Steve Nash?

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 9, 2011 5:14 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes

Then act like an MVP.  The more you appear to be instrumental to a company’s Steve Nash success [with out the mind numbing ego part] the more bargaining power you have.  Steve Nash for example is a great guy – easy going, very pleasant, with a good sense of humour – which just adds to his presence.

Be forth coming with the details of your success which are relevant to the potential employer.  Remain calm when they drill you for the details. Credit your team where warranted  – it makes you look twice as good – AND they're going to find out any way when they check your references.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

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From MVP to MPA: The 7 Rules of Engagment with Head-hunters

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 10, 2011 6:01 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes

In his article The Odds of Getting A Job With a Recruiter,  John Sumser says that , "the overall odds are about 1 in 28,520 (.0035%) that your conversation with a headhunter will land you a job." HR Examiner job-hunter-issue-cover-v218

I disagree.

The odds are far worse – mostly because John's math is more generous than it should be.

But you can beat the odds if… you understand the 7 Rules of Engagement.

Most job hunters have no idea how to interact or what to expect from a real  head-hunter like Skip Freeman or myself for that matter.

BUT – headhunters can be a great ally in your job search if you know the Rules or  Engagement – which we will start talking about right now. 

1st Rule of Engagement: Act like an MPA…

Yesterday I asked if you wanted to be paid like basketball MVP Steve Nash? Steve has been chosen multiple times as the NBA's Most Valuable Player.  The recruiting industry has an equivalent designation – that you either have or don't have – and it will determine whether you are successful with a recruiter.  That designation is MPA or "Most Placeable Applicant" or "Most Placeable Candidate"

By acting like the perfect candidate you are more likely to get a recruiter to pay attention to you AND market you to their client base.  And it all starts with you and your behaviour.  when a recruiter/headhunter calls, be prepared to tell the recruiter why you deserve to be designated an “MPA”. 

To be an MPA you need to have a well-honed and rare skill set.  Being a C++ programmer isn’t rare.  Being a mainframe Java programmer with 5 years of real-time experience might be.  Likewise, most financial people are “vanilla”.  Unless of course you have US GAAP experience and/or have done an IPO on NASDAQ.  I am sure you get the idea. 

What do you do if you aren’t as rare as the next guy? 

Have a great personality and co-operate.  If you actually look like you can follow instructions and will partner with the recruiter, they may just invest a few days in marketing you. 

If you're really a good sport and follow up and follow through on with their guidance they may map out your entire career with you.  After 25 years in business as a head-hunter I have helped more than a few people ascend from programmer or salesman to President and CEO through the careful management of their opportunities.

1st Rule of Engagement: Act like an MPA even if  you're not!

Until tomorrow.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

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The 7 Rules of Engagment with Head-hunters: Rule 3

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 12, 2011 6:01 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes

The 7 Rules of Engagment is a multi-part article so you may wish to start here.

3rd Rule of Engagement: Be Selective – Target Your Efforts

Don’t bother sending your resume to all 1,000,000 recruiters; find one who specializes in recruiting your talents. Target marketing

Recruiters generally specialize by geography, function, or industry, or a combination.  Go to Google.com and put in your city, industry and the word ‘head-hunter.' Voila!  More head-hunters than you can shake a stick at.  Read their sites carefully. 

Check out Kennedy Publications for their list of top head-hunters at www.kennedyinfo.com Kennedy is THE authority.

woundeer what a really smart job hunter would do?  They would infiltrate the largest recruiter specific web site on teh planet RecruitngBlogs.com to find out how recruiters think and what they do to find candiates AND then they owuld reverse engineer that so they could be found… wait that's what my book Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters is about.  Don't do that!

But do go and read what the industry luminaries think: Bill Humbert, Donato Diorio, Animal, Rayanee Throne

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

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The 7 Rules of Engagment with Head-hunters: Rule 4

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 13, 2011 6:36 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes

The 7 Rules of Engagment is a multi-part article so you may wish to start here.

4th Rule of Engagement: Don't Play Dumb Dumb_and_dumber_dvd_film_cover

There are three people in this world that need to know your current salary: the IRS, your spouse and your head-hunter.  (Actually, I'm not convinced the first two need to know – but I digress). 

I know most people like to keep this information private, but head-hunters need to know because We need to exclude you from all jobs under your salary level

If you play cat-and-mouse with us you’ll end up in the circular filing. Most head-hunters don’t use your salary to peg your seniority.  Provide your cash salary requirements.

In fact you likely already know that most recruiters work on contingency which means they only get paid IF they place you AND they get paid a percentage – so the more money you make – the more money they make.  It's a symbiotic relationship.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

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The 7 Rules of Engagment with Head-hunters: Rule 5

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 14, 2011 6:36 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes

The 7 Rules of Engagment is a multi-part article so you may wish to start here.

5th Rule of Engagement: Use industry standard technology to deliver your resume to a headhunter you DO NOT know.Standby

Don't assume that recruiters have every possible technology in place to receive and read your  resume. We don't AND while you make think you're being 'cool' and showing them you can use the latest and greatest technology… they might not be as smart as you are and can't read it. 

Lord knows they're not going to ask you to resend it in a format they can use because:

a. they don't know you so they don't care

b. they don't know they should care

c. they don't care.

Headhunters sometimes get  messages that say, "Use your Web browser to log onto my personal Web site and download a copy."  Forget it.  Only use industry standard technology unless you’re instructed otherwise. 

Unless you have specifically been told to send it in Word Perfect, Word or as PDF or told to post it on your LinkedIn profile so they can go and download it… copy and paste a text version into the message.  Create a compelling subject line and use their name in the headline.  Subject lines with "Dear Recruiter" are treated as SPAM – and not the good luncheon meat kind 😉

Lastly if you have a spam alert messaging service that automatically blocks people who aren't known to you and require the recipient to fill out a detailed life history in order to qualify to have their message delivered to you… you might want to rethink that strategy OR at least see if you can automatically 'whitelist' those people you send messages to so when they respond they are not trapped by the filter. 

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

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The 7 Rules of Engagment with Head-hunters: Rule 6

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 15, 2011 6:37 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes

The 7 Rules of Engagment is a multi-part article so you may wish to start here.

6th Rule of Engagement: Headhunters recruit; career counsellors counsel!

Headhunters like myself are constantly inundated with requests for free career counselling, Lucy - the doctor is in free resume writing advice, free practice interview sessions, free job leads, etc.

While most of us are more than qualified in all of the above, our ‘real' job is to hunt heads for our client companies. Don’t expect you’re doing someone like me a favor by letting us “have a look at your resume” or “giving us the opportunity to market you”. 

You're not!

If you want career advice go see a career counselor – it's money well invested. 

You can find a ton of them on LinkedIn.  I even know a few myself: like Mark Haluska [ok – Mark is also a dam fine headhunter] or Cindy Howes with years and years of HR and change management experience.

Lastly, while career counselors get paid to help you 'find yourself and match that up to a great career – headhunters get paid when they place you – remember that difference and you'll do well.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

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The 7 Rules of Engagment with Head-hunters: Rule 7

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 16, 2011 9:43 am : Interviewing, Networking, Resumes

The 7 Rules of Engagment is a multi-part article so you may wish to start here.

6th Rule of Engagement: "Don't Talk to Strangers…"

If you have a job don't trust your career to a stranger. 

Having your resume ‘shotgun blasted Headley to every one of your current employer's competitors is a career-limiting move.  I know, years ago I worked with a fellow who – while you were in his office being interviewed – had his secretary blasting your resume out to the 400 companies that were pre-programed in the fax machine.  More than once he had a candidate's resume end up on his bosses desk. 

Working with a professional head-hunter can be a very rewarding experience for you and your career.  We tend to be connected to the people you want to know. So ask someone you know for a referral.  Who do you know that has landed a job lately?  Did they meet any great headhunters? Ask! 

Also, finding the bad ones ahead of time will save you some grief, so ask if they bumped in to one that's just plain horrible.  And ask why they thought it was a horrible meeting.   Always qualify the advice or referrals people give you because the headhunter could be fantastic, but just not deal in the area your friend was looking and refuse to help them.  That's fair.  Everyone is entitled to make a living.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

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How Job Hunters Should Use ZoomInfo to Crush the Competition

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : May 14, 2012 2:16 am : General, Interviewing, Strategy, Tactics

Bob called me in a panic a few months ago.  One of his well meaning friends had suggested his name to a recruiter for a job.  Trouble was – – –  it was Bob’s dream job. 

Poor Bob.   

The recruiter even liked what he heard during the telephone screening interview.  He asked him to come to  Nevada to meet the CEO and the board of directors.  That’s where the wheels came off the truck.

Bob was ecstatic, until he discovered he was just one of a dozen going for first interviews What about bob and he knew he was definitely “the most mature” [read old]. 

Bob’s a great guy. He’s in super shape and you’d never know he has nine children, a half dozen grandchildren and is just a few years away from a full pension.  He wanted this job in the worst way and needed a strategy to beat out the field of 40 year olds he was up against.

He needed a job search and interview plan and he needed it quickly.  We’ve talked about plans before.  You don’t do anything as a job hunter without a plan.

It was Saturday morning when he called [it was my birthday] and he’d need to leave for Reno in 5 days.  I offered to show him how headhunters source information when they’re starting an assignment.  I explained how to cold-call complete strangers [straight out of Chapter 9, Extreme Networking in my book, Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0: How to Stand Out from the Crowd and Tap Into the Hidden Job Market using Social Media and 999 other Tactics Today

First I showed him how to use ZoomInfo.com to find a list of the members of the board and then I showed him how to use Google to get their home addresses and look up their home phone numbers.  He needed to find a board member to call who would be willing to answer a few questions about the organization's vision and mission.  he needed an informed insider.  

It took him two hours on Sunday morning to find a board member who was willing to answer his questions.  As Bob was wrapping up this phone call the board member told him that he was impressed with his chutzpah as well as the due diligence he was doing. 

What this fellow did next literally floored Bob.  he revealed that he was on the selection committee and was looking forward to meeting him next week and offered to send him a copy of the organization’s strategic plan.  Bob accepted.

After reviewing the strategic plan Bob called the lobbyist who had put his name forward and received confirmation on what he believed where going to be the organization’s biggest challenges. He expected he board would have heard about his phone call and would be extra prepared to drill him so he prepared a 45 minute power point to take the board through a discussion on how he would handle the issues he uncovered. 

Bob’s 1 hour interview went 3 hours and then he was asked to join the CEO and board members for dinner that evening.  He returned home with an offer that was 40% higher than his current salary, with full benefits, club memberships, car allowance and a signing bonus.

Why did this work?Zoominfo and the secret life of recruiters

Bob used the 5 days before his official interview to dig deep into the organization’s issues and map them against his skills and determine how he could best add value.  In an interview nobody cares about you the candidate.  Interviewers care about themselves and solving their problems.  You must show them what you’re going to do and how you’re going to do it.  The interview is your time to tell them what you can do for them first AND then drill down on the opportunity to see if it’s right for you.  Here’s yet another guerrilla success story.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

 

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NEW: Absolute Job Search Guide

David Perry aka The Rogue Recruiter : June 7, 2011 2:59 am : General, Interviewing, Strategy, Tactics

Are you looking for a job? Frustrated with HR managers who don’t call you back? Confused about what to do next?

Help is here!

Now you can get more calls to interview for good jobs with North America’s best employers, with the tactics and strategies in The ABSOLUTE JOB SEARCH GUIDE. Absolute-Job-Search-Guide-791x1024

Following this simple, step-by-step system, you will discover:

  • how to get noticed by employers, with targeted résumés and cover letters
  • how and where to network (so you can avoid the “pity parties” at most job clubs) • job search etiquette … and pitfalls to avoid
  • how to follow up after sending your résumé — without being a pest
  • what to do before, during and after you interview to maximize your results
  • how to really crack the hidden job market
  • help with the most difficult interview questions — including salary

Stop spinning your wheels. Start getting more interviews and job offers. The ABSOLUTE JOB SEARCH GUIDE shows you how!

Only $29.  Click the Buy Now button below.

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

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