3 Mistakes Displaced Employees Make After Being Down-Sized

In spite of those who tried to stop us – my book launch in Detroit was a success.   If you’re still looking for a job what I’m about to tell you is important.   

Let me explain. 

When Kevin Donlin and I decided we were going to Detroit to launch my book Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters we did it knowing full well that Detroit was the hardest hit major city in America. Unemployment was north of 30% in surrounding areas.

We thought we would be welcomed with open arms. 

We were dead wrong. [I’ll get to that in a second.]   In preparation we:

  • booked an auditorium
  • put out a press release
  • called all the radio and TV outlets in Detroit in case they wanted to interview us about how our guerrilla job search tactics were helping people get jobs in as little as 7 weeks [one did]
  • contracted with a television camera crew to capture the 2 hours on tape, and
  • hired an editor to produce a DVD. [We thought we could film the 2 hour event and sell the DVD to recoup our costs.] 

Lastly, we put the word out through job search clubs and coaches in and around Detroit. 

That was our downfall. 

Six days before the event I logged on to Event Bright to see how many people had signed up. NONE.  That's right with 6 days to go not one person was coming.  I couldn’t figure out why.  When Kevin and i talked in other cities people came out in record numbers.  In Toronto for example the venue had to be changed 4 times as the organizer who was hoping to attract 50 people saw 283 show up…. many not getting in… but I digress.

In a panic I started calling the job search clubs to see if they knew what was going on.  And after leaving a few dozen voicemails I finally connected with one.   Their candor rocked my world. 

They told me that it wasn’t in their best interest to help anyone get a job faster than normal.

Huh?  They explained to me that they got paid by several agencies to help people look for a job AND they also made money by charging job hunters to come and listen to their speakers every week,  so it wasn't in their best interest to help them get back to work quickly. 

I hung up the phone in shock.  Now it would be irresponsible for me to say that all job search clubs or coaches thought this way – that just can’t be true – but their logic was sound.  They were paid for activity NOT results. 

I went apoplectic.    

When I calmed down I called Kevin and told him what I’d found out.  Thankfully he’s levelheaded and brilliant.  He’s also a man of action who makes things happen.  With an hour he had hired a plane to fly over the football game against The University of Notre Dame that weekend towing a giant banner that read:  Job Hunting?  www.PutMichiganBackToWork.com  That’s a picture of the banner below.  And then Kevin issued a press release announcing a contest. 

Airplanewbanner

We filled the place and had a great event. 

And we made a decision to give the DVD away… lots of them. 

The uptake has been outstanding. 

Here's what's in it for you.

People have gotten jobs just by watching the video. They’ve had that a-huh moment.  They’ve gotten unstuck and landed jobs quickly.  Many in less than 7 weeks a few in under two weeks.  It will soon be time for us to recoup our investment – but for now the DVD is still free. 

So if:

  • you’re stuck and wondering why
  • tired of sending out resumes and never hearing back from people 
  • burned through your network of contacts and still come up empty
  • have trouble articulating to an employer why your perfect OR
  • just tired of doing the same thing over and over again expecting success

…then watch the DVD. 

You’ve got everything to gain.  But do it now because I want to start selling this and it will only be FREE for a little while more. 

What's the catch?  

I want you to try these ideas and see that they work AND then tell all your friends how you landed your job – I want them to come back in a few weeks buy a copy of the DVD for $49.99 [remember free won’t last] or hire one of our coaches to do a Guerrilla Résumé for them. 

Don't share your DVD with your friends.  That's your competitive advantage.  Just tell them where they can get their own copy after you land.

Here's a link to read the whole story  OR

Grab Your FREE Copy Now While You Still Can use code: 49DVD 

Sex sells.

Does your resume excite and motivated people like lingerie from Victoria’s Secrets or Old flannel nightgown keep them guessing like flannel?

Make it easy for an employer to see what they’re after. And what exactly is sexy to an employer?  Quantifiable results and accomplishments!

Prepare a 1 page resume and dress it up with the names and logos of the major clients you’ve sold. Employers want to know about your wins first not your responsibilities.

Boring black and white resumes are like flannel nighties – they're comfortable but may not get you the attention you're looking for.  

 

Guerilla Your Way into New Industry: Tips for Getting a Job that’s Outside Your Area of Expertise

While many tips here on Guerilla Job Hunting deal with finding a job using creative, beyond-the-norm methods, the presupposition of most advice is that you are looking for work that's immediately within your purview. That is to say, it is assumed that you want a job that fits in neatly with other jobs you've had in the past, or is in some way or another related to what you've studied in school. But what if you want to try something new? Whether you've been working in the same industry for years and desperately want a change of scenery, or you've just finished school with a major in business but want a job in something as far-fetched as graphic design, there are certainly things you can do to find employment that conventional wisdom says you aren't suited for. Here are some tips.

 

1. Go beyond transferable skills.

The first piece of advice that many job search gurus will proffer in an effort to help you get a job outside your industry is to emphasize "transferable skills". But as Liz Ryan, a former HR executive for a Fortune 500 company notes in her GlassDoor article, when you talk to hiring managers, whether in an interview setting or in your resume, about your transferable skills, you run the risk of over-generalizing what you have to offer. The most basic transferable skills, like "communication skills" or "teamwork skills" say nothing about who you are or why you should be hired. Highlight what makes you special in the context of your new industry with specific examples of past success.

 

2. Do your research

Of course, this goes without saying. You can't expect to break into a new line of work by only displaying a passing interest. Especially since you may not yet have any substantive experience relating to the new job you want, you're going to have to hit the books, the industry journals, and any other media that you can get your hands on in order to educate yourself. If you are truly passionate about the new industry, you'll do your homework well in advance of even contemplating breaking into the field.

 

3. Offer your primary expertise in exchange for training and insight.

This method, one that I read about in a recent Wall Street Journal article, I thought was simply brilliant. The author, founder and CEO of a small social networking-based company, advises that you offer your primary expertise to a small company or non-profit related to the industry you want to break into. Offer your services on a project-basis for little or no money, and ask if, in exchange, you can learn about your new industry from an insider's point of view. While there are of course no certainties when using this method, it will certainly help you get your foot in the door in terms of getting the necessary experience for a full-time job in the industry later on.

 

4. Go beyond reading by spending time with industry professionals.

You can read all you want about the industry you're hoping to break into, but theoretical knowledge, while certainly useful, goes only so far. Comb your social networks, whether online or off, to find people you know in the industry for which you want to find employment. Attend industry conferences and put yourself out there. By interacting with those in your target industry, not only will you build future contacts in the event of job openings, but you'll also learn all the intimate details from the industry lingo to the latest trends that can only be gained by seeing theoretical knowledge put into practice.

 

By-line:

This guest post is contributed by Tara Miller, who writes on the topics of psychology degree.  She welcomes your comments at her email Id: miller.tara23@gmail.com.

 

The Other Cost of Unemployment « Greg Quirk’s Blog

When you are looking for a job there is the obvious cost of your situation – money.  If you break it down each day you are spending looking for work is a lost opportunity cost.  For example, if you are looking to make $80,000 a year, each day works out to about $300 you are not making, or $1500 a week (before taxes).  While employment insurance can make up for some of that, it is not going to be even half of the amount.  Plus you are missing other benefits, such as health care and holidays.

via gregquirk.wordpress.com

Guest blog: Selling Vacuums and Job Interviews

I have seen it a million times. People that are the perfect match for a job fold under the pressure of a job interview. The job market has changed, and no longer can you tell an employer about the tasks you did at your previous companies.JimFromTaxi

With so many skilled, educated and creative candidates to pick from, hiring managers are looking for the best of the best. They want to know if you fit into the company culture, what your Emotional Quotient is, who you are, and what you can do for them.

The only way to win the interview is to handle like a sales meeting where you present  yourself in the best possible light about what you can do for them. Let’s be honest. You are selling your services to them in exchange for pay and benefits.

If you want the job, you better be able to make a living selling vacuums.

I recently had the privilege to read a preview of David Perry’s new book, Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0: How to Stand Out from the Crowd and Tap Into the Hidden Job Market using Social Media and 999 other Tactics Today. What a book. There is so much information in it that was not in the previous 2 editions.

In one of the chapters he tells us that the 3-R’s have changed since we all went to school. No longer are they Reading, ‘Riting and “Rithmatic. He stresses that if you want to get an A+ and land your job you better focus Research, Relevancy, and Resiliency.

Without stealing his thunder, he is spot on. Unless you research a company from top to bottom you will never understand them. In doing your Research you must find a way to ensure that you are the Relevant solution to the needs the company has. You must also be Resilient. You have to learn how to handle all the no’s in life.

Those three R’s are the very tools that a good vacuum salesperson needs when going door to door.  The ones who have mastered those skills get paid well. Those who have not… well, you know.

Do you remember the show Taxi? It was one of my favorites. In one particular episode called “One The Job – Part 1”  the gang meets at Mario’s to discuss what they have been doing since the Sunshine Taxi Company went bankrupt.

Reverend Jim Ignatowski took up a new job selling vacuums door to door.  I want you to watch his use of David Perry’s 3-R’s here – http://bit.ly/fjOgLW

Will you fold under the pressure?

Or can you sell vacuums and master the job interview?

_____________________________________________________________________

Wayne Eells is the Founder and CEO of Eells Consulting which specializes in helping Entrepreneurs and Small Businesses achieve strong long term growth. Wayne’s 5-Star Backcast Method has earned him the label of Business Accelerator.  His experiences include working as a pastry chef, a firefighter/EMS provider, and working with NASCAR and the race teams.

 

 

 

Unraveling the Relocation Decision and Making the Leap Strategically

Trust a guy who works in self storage to develop an eye for the little stuff. I've come to believe that it's the little things that matter the most when it comes to the quality of our lives. But the little things are exactly what people don't normally look at when they are making a relocation decision – and they should. Why? If you relocate to another city for a job and are unhappy, it's not going to be because you don't like the job or your salary. I've talked to many people who were unhappy about a move after they made it. If your relocation ends up giving you the blues, the reason will probably be something that seemed little when you were first considering the relocation: you didn't realize the commute would drive you crazy, you miss your family and friends, you don't like the weather, you can't find your favorite brands in the local grocery store, or the local culture isn't a good fit for you.

I'm not saying that you shouldn't relocate or that you shouldn't be willing to try something new and have an adventure. What I'm suggesting is that you leave yourself an exit strategy. Even email is retractable these days – certainly YOU should be! How do you set up your relocation so that you can beat a hasty retreat if the new situation isn't to your liking? Here are a few ideas:

  • Decide on a "trial period" in which you plan to try out the new job. Your trial period should be long enough for you to be certain how you feel about the new city as well as the job – but not so long that the transition phase seems to drag on forever and adds inordinately to your moving expenses. If your new job includes a training period, your trial period should be longer than the training period itself, so that you can get a feel for what the job is like when you're really on it.

  • Don't sell your home right away. (In this market, you probably won't be able to anyway!) If you can, find short-term renters. Decide how long you want to test the waters in your new city (6 months? a year?), and offer a lease for about that amount of time. You can rent your home fully furnished, if you are comfortable doing that, or put your furniture in storage for the time being.

  • If you can, don't move at all for the first few months. Commute from a distance by finding somewhere inexpensive to live during the week, and returning to your former home town on weekends. Some employers will cover the cost of commuting or will let you telecommute some of the time, commuting to the new location for just a few days per week or on alternate weeks. If you can arrange a system like that, do so – it will make it easy for you to try out the new city without being totally committed to it. One way to make this system less expensive is to find someone to stay with in your new town. If you do have to move out of your old home for financial reasons, rent a short term apartment in the new city, while staying with family or friends in your old home town on weekends.

  • Use your time wisely – off the job. Explore neighborhoods in your new town. Check out grocery stores, libraries, schools, churches, parks, bus lines, bike trails, doctors and dentists – anything that is likely to be a big part of your family's lifestyle.

  • Don't burn your bridges. This may seem obvious, but don't burn your bridges at your old job. You may decide you want to come back.

Think strategically about whether to let your employer know that you are just trying the job out to begin with. You may find that it's worthwhile to seem less than thrilled about the new assignment. If your employer knows that you haven't burned your bridges in your old home town, you may be able to negotiate for better working conditions, better benefits or even a higher salary later if the company finds you indispensable in the new location.

If you're thinking of relocating for a job, go for it! Just remember, you can always come back.

In his role in the self storage industry, Tim Eyre helps customers care for their cherished belongings that must be put in storage. Tim regularly visits his facilities including a Birmingham Self Storage center. He also was recently meeting customers and staff at the Denver Self Storage Center.

Preview of Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0

G3 cover II Every year, 50-million jobs are filled in the United States — almost all without a job   posting.  Employers are relying on a brand new digital suite of tools and tactics to find the handful of “most qualified” recruits that they want to interview.”

Because of this, we put a booster rocket on our earlier book, going beyond ‘where to look’, to include "how to be found".  The secret to finding a suitable job today lies in mastering the digital search environment used by employers which includes, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter Branchout, HubSpot, ZoomInfo and more.  It's confusing mess so we've simplified it for you and focused on those tools that bring you results fast.

If you're interested, you may fill in your name and email address below to preview chapters of the book.  

Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0: How to Stand Out from the Crowd and Tap Into the Hidden Job Market using Social Media and 999 other Tactics Today  

 

 

Preview of Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0

G3 cover II Every year, 50-million jobs are filled in the United States — almost all without a job   posting.  Employers are relying on a brand new digital suite of tools and tactics to find the handful of “most qualified” recruits that they want to interview.”

Because of this, we put a booster rocket on our earlier book, going beyond ‘where to look’, to include "how to be found".  The secret to finding a suitable job today lies in mastering the digital search environment used by employers which includes, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter Branchout, HubSpot, ZoomInfo and more.  It's confusing mess so we've simplified it for you and focused on those tools that bring you results fast.

If you're interested, you may fill in your name and email address below to preview chapters of the book.  

Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0: How to Stand Out from the Crowd and Tap Into the Hidden Job Market using Social Media and 999 other Tactics Today  

 

 

The 7 Rules of Engagment with Head-hunters: Rule 2

The 7 Rules of Engagment is a multi-part article so you may wish to start here.

2nd Rule of Engagement: Find a head-hunter BEFORE you need a new job.    

Most job hunters are a lot like people who drive their cars until they run out of gas: pathetic souls standing on shoulder of life's highway waitng for someone to stop and help them out.  Not smart.  Guillotine

Don’t wait until you know you’re going to be reallocated to make friends with a headhunter because we all know 99% of people wait until their heads are in the guillotine and the blades being dropped before they wisper sweet nothings in our ears. 

Too late!  In business you always try to stay ahead of the curve.  Plan ahead! 

Put another way, you bought life insurance to prepare for the inevitable – treat your career as your biggest asset – goodness knows it’s not your house anymore. 

You need to have a six-month runway to work a head-hunter strategically.  Your initial contact is to let the head-hunter know you exist.  Your goal is to get them to keep you in mind for career-building positions opportunities and/or to market you.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.

 

 

 

Job hunter, want to be paid like basketball MVP Steve Nash?

Then act like an MVP.  The more you appear to be instrumental to a company’s Steve Nash success [with out the mind numbing ego part] the more bargaining power you have.  Steve Nash for example is a great guy – easy going, very pleasant, with a good sense of humour – which just adds to his presence.

Be forth coming with the details of your success which are relevant to the potential employer.  Remain calm when they drill you for the details. Credit your team where warranted  – it makes you look twice as good – AND they're going to find out any way when they check your references.

Want more ideas like these?

You can listen in on an hour’s worth of unconventional, Guerrilla secrets and judge for yourself by grabbing a copy of our Free Audio CD.